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As a journalism professor I see lots of students who have big dreams. They imagine themselves working in glamorous jobs, usually in television, in the not-too distant future. They want to be ESPN anchors, host their own talk shows or be marquee columnists for top newspapers or websites. That’s fine. I never discourage my students from dreaming big. But too often these big dreamers lack three key elements in their thinking: 1) an understanding of the hard work and sacrifice that’s required to achieve such goals 2) a realistic assessment of what kinds of career goals are actually attainable 3) a sense of how importantRead More →

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It’s a time-honored progression: you start writing for your college newspaper and before you know it you’re recruited to be an editor. Suddenly, badly written articles are being thrown at you left and right and you don’t have a clue about what to do. This isn’t unusual. At many college newspapers, editing skills are picked up on the fly. With that in mind, here’s a list of eight things for new editors to watch out for. Buried leads – it’s not uncommon for beginning journalism students to do what’s called burying the lead. That means they put the most important information in a news storyRead More →

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If you’re going into journalism, chances are you’re going to have to learn to shoot and edit digital video. Shooting raw footage isn’t too difficult, and often can be done on something as straightforward as a smartphone. However, news outlets will usually want reporters to use a professional editing program in order to give such videos a professional look. Probably the two most widely used programs are Apple’s Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Pro. Both programs are used by professional videographers and as such offer a lot of options, which can make them tricky to master. But you don’t have to be the nextRead More →

Protesters gather in the streets of Tokat, Turkey following the failed coup

The ramifications of the recent failed coup in Turkey are still playing out, but it seems likely that the country’s already beleaguered news media will face even more repression and censorship in the days to come. The coup, launched on the evening of July 15 by factions of the Turkish military, resulted in at least 290 people being killed – including a photographer for a pro-government newspaper who was gunned down by soldiers – and more than 1,000 injured. Images of the uprising – including shots of CNN’s sister network in Turkey being taken over – were broadcast live worldwide. Since the government regained controlRead More →

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Computer network support specialists. Architectural and engineering managers. Electrical engineers. Those all sound like pretty good careers, ones with decent employment prospects. And yet each of those those fields employ roughly the same number of people in the U.S. – around 180,000 – as newspapers. According to a recent report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are 183,200 people working for newspapers nationwide. That compares to 184,570 computer network support specialists, 179,770 architectural and engineering managers, and 178,580 electrical engineers. The funny thing is, I haven’t read any depressing articles about how there are no jobs to be had for computer network support specialists,Read More →