Reporters covering the slayings

It was the kind of case one might expect to find in Philadelphia to the south or New York to the north, but the slayings of four young men over a few sweltering days in July became one of the biggest and most tragic stories to come out of the bucolic Bucks County suburbs in years. It began when Thomas Meo, 21, Mark Sturgis, 22, and Jimi Patrick and Dean Finocchiaro, both 19, vanished seemingly without a trace in early July. Cops arrested Cosmo DiNardo, a hulking 20-year-old with a history of bizarre behavior, and searchers started combing a tract of farmland owned by DiNardo’sRead More →

TONGJI Campus Siping Lu vor der 100 Jahrfeier

Everyone is familiar – and if they aren’t, they should be – with the scene in “A Charlie Brown Christmas” where Linus asks Lucy to give him one good reason why he should memorize his lines for the Christmas play. Lucy tells him, “I’ll give you five good reasons,” then proceeds to curl her fingers into a fist that she shakes menacingly at her brother. “Those are good reasons,” Linus responds sensibly. There are many reasons why journalism students should get involved with their college newspaper, but, using Lucy’s example, let me set out (in an entirely unthreatening way) the five most important. 1) It’sRead More →

students

As a journalism professor I see lots of students who have big dreams. They imagine themselves working in glamorous jobs, usually in television, in the not-too distant future. They want to be ESPN anchors, host their own talk shows or be marquee columnists for top newspapers or websites. That’s fine. I never discourage my students from dreaming big. But too often these big dreamers lack three key elements in their thinking: 1) an understanding of the hard work and sacrifice that’s required to achieve such goals 2) a realistic assessment of what kinds of career goals are actually attainable 3) a sense of how importantRead More →

paper1

Computer network support specialists. Architectural and engineering managers. Electrical engineers. Those all sound like pretty good careers, ones with decent employment prospects. And yet each of those those fields employ roughly the same number of people in the U.S. – around 180,000 – as newspapers. According to a recent report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are 183,200 people working for newspapers nationwide. That compares to 184,570 computer network support specialists, 179,770 architectural and engineering managers, and 178,580 electrical engineers. The funny thing is, I haven’t read any depressing articles about how there are no jobs to be had for computer network support specialists,Read More →

hand-on-keyboard-1242207

The headline on a well-known journalism website – “There are now more Americans working for online-only outlets than newspapers” – seemed to be yet another one of those sign-of-the-times studies showing how print journalism is going the way of the dinosaurs in the brave new digital world. And someone not reading the accompanying article carefully might get the impression that there are now more journalists working specifically for online-only news websites – the Buzzfeeds and the Huffington Posts of the world – than for newspapers. But that’s not exactly what the numbers show. The article was based on data from the U.S. Bureau of LaborRead More →